Tuesday, February 07, 2006

3000-Year-Old Prayer House Discovered in Qoli Darvish


Tehran, 7 February 2006 (CHN) -- Everyday some new interesting discoveries are made in Qoli-Darvish historical site near Qom. Discovery of a fire temple and prayer house with an urban architectural plan belonging to the Iron Age for the first time in this historical site as well as a jar burial dating back to the third millennium BC have encouraged archaeologists to continue their studies in Qoli-Darvish historical site.
“This season of excavation in Qoli Darvish historical site was so fruitful that two months of excavations was not enough to finish excavation studies on this ancient site. Therefore, we need more time to complete our excavations,” said Siamak Sarlak, head of excavation team in Qoli-Darvish historical site.
Qoli Darvish historical Tepe (hill), located on the way of Qom-Jamkaran highway, is one of the most important historical sites in the Central Plateau belonging to the Iron Age. Archaeological excavations in Qoli Darvish historical site indicates that residency in Qom dates back to the forth millennium BC.
During the third season of archaeological excavations in Qoli Darvish Tepe, the first fire temple and prayer house belonging to the Iron Age in the Central Plateau of Iran was discovered and unearthed which had remained almost intact and is considered one of the most important discoveries in this historical site (besides the Pre-Achaemenid Cuneiform Inscription).
“This prayer house with the fire temple at its center was deliberately sealed with adobe during the first millennium BC, and then the raised platform of Qoli Darvish was built on it. The excavation team in Qoli Darvish succeeded in unearthing this prayer house, which is almost intact after 3000 years,” added Sarlak. The first urban architectural plan belonging to the Iron Age (the first millennium BC) along with a jar burial dating back to the third millennium BC were the other important discoveries in Qoli Darvish hill.
“During the archaeological excavations in the 5000-year-old layers of Qoli Darvish, we could trace the developed culture of inhabitants of this region which was quite unique in Central Plateau of Iran,” explained Sarlak.
The first archaeological excavations in this historical hill started three years ago which resulted in numerous discoveries such that the archaeologists now regard Qoli Darvish Tepe as a potential archaeological site in which hides valuable information about this region’s past.

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